New Collections in the Memphis Room

We’ve added quite a few collections over the past few months, and while their records have been added to the Collection of Collections, these newly processed collections deserve a little attention here on the blog:

The Memphis Park Properties Collection contains records donated by the City of Memphis pertaining to the history and development of many of Memphis’ parks.  Processed by Joan Cannon.

 

 

 

The Chandler Collection contains extensive property records, from 1968 to 2002.  Processed by Carol Maynard.

 

 

 

 

The NOW – Memphis Chapter Collection provides a record of the Memphis chapter of the National Organization for Women during the pivotal years of the 1970s and 1980s.  Processed by Jordan Redmon.

 

 

 

The documents of the Central Gardens Historic District Collection shed light on the history of the iconic Midtown neighborhood.  Processed by Lauren Peterson.

 

 

 

View programs and flyers from the oldest music society in Memphis — and probably Tennessee — in the Beethoven Club Programs Collection.  Processed by Joan Cannon.

 

 

 

The Douglass Oral History Collection provides a wealth of information about the legendary Douglass community, as well as documentation for those interested in embarking on their own oral history project.  Processed by Sarah Frierson.

 

 

 

The Edwin D. Thompson Trolley and Streetcar Collection contains extensive documentation on streetcar and trolley companies in Memphis.  The collection includes numerous photographs.  Processed by Joan Cannon.

 

 

 

The Peggy Jemison Neighborhood Collection covers Annesdale Park, Beale Street, Bethel-LaBelle, Cherokee, Cooper-Young, Greenlaw, Smokey City, South Main, and Vollintine-Evergreen.  Processed by Betty Blaylock and Clara McMillan.

 

 

 

The Edward LeMaster Downtown Real Estate Survey Collection provides a glimpse at the commercial and industrial landscape of downtown Memphis in the late-1940s.  Processed by Joan Cannon.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Collections, Memphis History

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s